What will you leave behind?

Standard

I was watching the news today and I saw a news report about the funeral of AFL legend Jim Stynes. At the same time, a news bar rolled across informing me that Kyle Sandilands (ugh, I hate to even write his name out loud) has been officially found to have breached the Australian Communications and Media Authority’s standards of decency with his vitriolic rant against a journalist last year. For the uninitiated, he called her a “fat slag”, told her he would “hunt her down” and other nauseating crap I do not care to repeat. All because she reported on his failed attempt at a TV show which rated poorly.

Two men. One already being remembered as an inspiration, leaving behind a family and a legacy. The other, consistently getting in trouble for shooting his arrogant, hateful mouth off. I don’t understand how these people operate. Alan Jones, Stan Zemaneck, Kyle Sandilands and the like. I know one of you has lain on your death bed. I wonder what you thought about? Did you think you left the world a better place? Left behind a legacy that will benefit future generations in some way? Any regrets? With a heart, head and mouth full of such hateful, divisive dribble, I can’t imagine how you can face your last hours without thinking, was that really the best I could do? 

Some of the words used to describe Jim Stynes today were gentle, dependable, strong, sincere and courageous. I didn’t know him, but he sounds like a great guy to know. I’d be completely honoured if, after my death, people were able to say words like that about me. I’ll have failed as a human being if people were to say that I incited hate and racism or that my legacy was that I was remembered for publicly humiliating and threatening people. No matter where you stand on spirituality, we are all going to one day face the time, it may be a moment, it may be a few days or  couple of hours, where we’ll have to own how we’ve chosen to spend our time. What we know in our hearts what we’ll be remembered for. When we’ll have to ask, was that really the best I could do? Sounds like Jim Stynes can say yes to that.

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One response »

  1. Pingback: On Being Nice « muse de muzz

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